Kaupapa Maori

Nau mai, Haere mai, ki te kaunihera-ā-rohe o Taupō / Welcome to the Taupō District Council.

Within the boundaries of the Taupō District is the ancestral home to four iwi (tribes); Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Ngāti Tahu / Ngāti Whaoa and Raukawa. Each iwi has associated hapu or sub-tribes. These ‘tangata whenua’ groupings play a vital role as kaitiaki (guardians) of natural resources, cultural sites of significance and waahi tapu. ​Hapu and iwi are connected to the whenua (land) through occupation and whakapapa (genealogy). The four main iwi hold mana whenua status for different parts of the Taupō District's land area and beyond. A branch of Ngāti Kahungunu from the Wairarapa also now resides on part of the Pouakani lands in the northern reaches of the district. All iwi help guide Taupō District Council with issues pertaining to their whenua tupuna (ancestral lands).

Māori Land Rates Factsheet

Questions about Maori land rates are very common among Māori land owners. Tangata whenua still retain 38.6% of the total land area of the Taupō District. Māori have an enduring cultural relationship with their ancestral lands and this defines them as whānau, hapū and iwi. However there are economic forces connected to all land that need to be managed prudently. One of these obligations is Taupo District Council rates. 

Maori Land rates factsheet (PDF 664Kb)

This document will give you a simple explanation of rates are calculated and applied to Māori land and other facts for your consideration. Note; This data is taken from the 2012-2013 rating year and is a snap-shot of that period only.

Taupō District Council contact

Mr Dominic Bowden
Strategic Relationships Manager
Taupō District Council
dbowden@taupo.govt.nz

 
Section 35A(2)(b) of the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA) requires each local authority to include in its records all the information provided to it by the Crown on:
  • the contact details of each iwi authority within the region or district of that local authority and areas over which one or more iwi exercise kaitiakitanga within that region or district; and
  • any groups that represent hapū for the purposes of the RMA and the areas over which one or more hapū exercise kaitiakitanga within the region or district of that local authority.
Te Kā hui Māngai: is the means by which the Crown fulfils the requirements of section 35A(2) of the RMA in terms of the information the Crown must provide to local authorities. Therefore each local authority, at a minimum, must include this information in its records. This information is available by visiting Te Kahui Mangai

Useful links

Tūwharetoa Māori Trust Board

 


The Tūwharetoa Māori Trust Board (the Board) is a body legislated to administer Ngāti Tūwharetoa assets handed down from our Tūpuna for the benefit of present and future generations of Ngāti Tūwharetoa.

Tūwharetoa Settlement Trust 

 


The Tūwharetoa Settlement Trust was established to receive, hold, manage and administer Ngāti Tūwharetoa’s share, and interest in the CNI Forests Collective Settlement.

Tauhara Geothermal Charitable Trust

Tauhara Geothermal Charitable Trust
The Tauhara Geothermal Charitable Trust was established in 2011 as a requirement of the resource consents for Contact Energy Ltd.’s Tauhara II Geothermal Project. ​

Ngāti Tūwharetoa​


The Ngati Tuwharetoa tribal territory is in the central North Island, around the Lake Taupo water catchment area. ​

​Ngāti Tahu / Ngāti Whaoa


​This rohe of Ngāti Tahu / Ngāti Whaoa extends into Atiamuri, Rotomahana, Kaingaroa and Wairapukao.

Ngāti Tahu-Ngati Whaoa ​


Ngati Tahu-Ngati Whaoa through Ngati Tahu-Ngati Whaoa Runanga Trust are one of three Te Arawa river Iwi that are represented through Te Arawa River Iwi Trust.

The Wairakei Charitable Trust


Wairakei Charitable Trust was formed to recognise and promote the partnership between Nga Hapu and Contact Energy Ltd. The Trust Deed was formalised and signed on May 1 2007.

   

Page reviewed: 05 Jun 2014 11:16am